MSN Live Search Adds A Captcha

msn-searchYes, I know the previous post published without being finished. I’ll have to fix that some time soon.

For some strange reason, I can’t get to Google today.  No Google search, no Google Adsense, no Google webmaster tools, no GMail which really is an issue.  Nothing.

So anyway, I still have things to do today.  I guess I have to to use another search engine to get some work done.

I’ve used MSN a number of times previously, usually to see how different search engines compare with certain search terms.  So I headed over to MSN.com to give it a try.

Imagine my complete surprise when the above captcha pops up. Not once, not twice but every single time I did a search.  And it wasn’t an easy captcha either but captchas with other characters in the background, making it harder to read. (At least for me.)

Now, I’m not a big fan of captchas.  I’ve noticed that they really don’t work and are easy to beat.  MSN isn’t alone with their use either.  Google’s done it before, recently as well, and they’re not that easy to read either. (Rather long if you ask me.) I don’t see it that often though on Google.  And it didn’t take 5 tries that it did with some of MSN’s.

Search Engine Smackdown

I’m sure you’ve head about Google Fight by now where you can Linus Torvalds matches up against Bill Gates or finally prove to yourself that Coke is better than Pepsi by comparing Google results between two different words.
Bringing it to the next level we have Search Engine Smackdown. Using the heavy weights of the Search Engine field, see how much trivia you know about the history of the market.
Technorati tags: Flash Games, Search Engines

Search Engine Smackdown

I’m sure you’ve head about Google Fight by now where you can Linus Torvalds matches up against Bill Gates or finally prove to yourself that Coke is better than Pepsi by comparing Google results between two different words.

Bringing it to the next level we have Search Engine Smackdown. Using the heavy weights of the Search Engine field, see how much trivia you know about the history of the market.

Search Engines

Simply makes a post about how MSN was the first search engine to crawl his or her blog and, in doing so, maybe the better search engine.

I’ve got to agree. When I ran my Daria site, the only search engine I didn’t have issues with was MSN’s. Both Yahoo and Google has thousands of bad links, they listed sites before my which had nothing to do with Daria, and were just a royal pain.

I went over to MarketLeap.com to compare the results for searches from the search engines for this site. Now, mind you, that Google’s blog search is big on promoting using ping services and says that that’s how it will pick up on the site.

Link Popularity Check:

Google: 0
Hotbot: 0
MSN: 8 (From 6 different sites)
Yahoo/ Altavista: 1 (But doesn’t list it)

Search Engine Saturation

Google: 0
HotBot: 5 (Home page plus 4 articles)
MSN: 1 (Home page)
Yahoo: 0

Mind you that this is now after 2 months of blogging here. Google’s blog index has three incoming links to this site but doesn’t have any of the pages indexed though. Strange…

I’ll take another look in a few days.

Searching for Search Engines

From Red Herring:

What Net surfers most commonly search for on the web is pretty surprising. Most actually end up looking for search engines themselves, according to Nielsen//NetRatings. It could be that they’re just lazy or don’t really know what they’re doing. The No. 1 search term in November 2005 was “eBay,” with 13.9 million requests, followed by “Google,” with 13.3 million requests. Rounding out the top five most common search terms were “Yahoo,” “Mapquest,” and “Yahoo.com.” Fully five out of the top 10 search terms were names of actual search engines, and all of the top 10 terms were names of web sites rather than topics. The first topical search term, “weather,” came in at a distant No. 23. “Whether this behavior is driven by ignorance or savvy, the end result is the same: The search engine is the focal point of the online experience for Internet users across the spectrum,” said Ken Cassar, chief analyst at Nielsen//NetRatings.

SOURCE: Nielsen//NetRatings